Intensive Interaction

Intensive Interaction aims to develop the fundamentals of communication.  These basic skills are the foundations for learning language, developing social skills and achievement in all school activities.

It is appropriate for anyone who is has not yet mastered the earliest fundamental, skills of interaction and communication.  Children who enjoy this approach may be diagnosed with autism, severe learning difficulties and profound learning difficulties.

Students of all ages work individually with a member of staff as their communication partner.  It is fun for both the student and their communication partner; sessions frequently involve lots of laughter and smiles from everyone.

The Fundamentals of Communication

  • Learning how to be with another person.
  • Learning to enjoy giving attention to another person
  • Learning to concentrate and attend
  • Use and understanding of non-verbal communication such as body language and gestures
  • Use and understanding of eye contacts
  • Use and understanding of facial expressions
  • Taking turns in exchanges of behaviour
  • Use and understanding of vocalisations
  • Learning about personal space and touch

The communication partner works to create enjoyable social situations with the student.  The pace of the interaction, the activities and the length of the session is controlled by the student.  The communication partner carefully observes the student and develops the activities when the time is right.  The student has the opportunities to practice using and understanding the fundamentals of communication. 

Sessions are always tailored to the individual learning needs and preferences of the student.  They may be fast paced and active or quiet and gentle. 

Everyone makes a different kind of progress. Some students will learn to enjoy and respond to the company of other people, many students make consistent, ongoing progress where they want to take part in a range of social experiences every day and other students may progress towards using vocalisations and speech to communicate.

If you would like to know more about this approach then this website is very informative http://www.intensiveinteraction.co.uk/about

Isac likes to chat with Ann, but in this session, he carefully surrounded himself with cushions and then invited Ann to play but only if she remained on the other side of the cushion wall.  Ann placed herself carefully in a non-threatening position, keeping her head and body low and at an appropriate distance in order to help Isac feel confident in the interaction.
Isac likes to chat with Ann, but in this session, he carefully surrounded himself with cushions and then invited Ann to play but only if she remained on the other side of the cushion wall. Ann placed herself carefully in a non-threatening position, keeping her head and body low and at an appropriate distance in order to help Isac feel confident in the interaction.
Aiden could be very lively and easily distracted but in this quiet session with Owen, he gives his full attention to Owen for many minutes.  They take turns in exchanges of behaviour such as vocalising or holding hands.  Aidan is in control of the whole session and it proceeds at the pace he chooses.  After a session, Aidan was noticeably calmer and more able to engage in the classroom.
Aiden could be very lively and easily distracted but in this quiet session with Owen, he gives his full attention to Owen for many minutes. They take turns in exchanges of behaviour such as vocalising or holding hands. Aidan is in control of the whole session and it proceeds at the pace he chooses. After a session, Aidan was noticeably calmer and more able to engage in the classroom.
Asad loves the conversation with Helen where she listens carefully to him and responds thoughtfully.  Their favourite game starts with Asad calling “Helen” and she responds by calling “Asad “ with the same intonation.  The game continues with Asad calling “Helen” in different ways.
Asad loves the conversation with Helen where she listens carefully to him and responds thoughtfully. Their favourite game starts with Asad calling “Helen” and she responds by calling “Asad “ with the same intonation. The game continues with Asad calling “Helen” in different ways.
This still photograph from a video of Rebecca and Karli illustrates shared attention.  Rebecca and Karli are both focussing on the handshapes made against the bubble tube.  They are enjoying each others company and have pleasure in sharing an interest.   This ability to share attention is one of the fundamental communication skills.
This still photograph from a video of Rebecca and Karli illustrates shared attention. Rebecca and Karli are both focussing on the handshapes made against the bubble tube. They are enjoying each others company and have pleasure in sharing an interest. This ability to share attention is one of the fundamental communication skills.
back to the Curriculum home page
this page on Facebook
Join us on Facebook our Facebook group & keep up with news & events
Click here to log in to your ParentMail feed